Week Four – My last week

I’m very sorry for the delay in my posts… I was ill during my last week in Birmingham and, sadly, a family member passed away at the end of my visit. The long trip back home to Australia, the funeral and commencing the second year of my Masters have all made these past few weeks very turbulent and busy.

The first three weeks of my placement absolutely flew by, as they were filled with so many things to do and learn, but it still seemed like a shock when my final week arrived! I think my busy schedule took its toll as, unfortunately, from Sunday to Tuesday of my fourth week I felt very “poorly”, as the English say, and had to take some time off from my placement. Sadly this meant I missed out on installing the Oliver Lodge exhibition with Marie from the Wilson Conservation Studio and a session working on my WWI pamphlet at Winterbourne House but, thankfully, I was able to catch up with everyone on the Friday.

Jan de Beer, 'Joseph and the Suitors', c.1515-1520, oil on oak. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.
Jan de Beer, ‘Joseph and the Suitors’, c.1515-1520, oil on oak. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.
Jan de Beer, 'The Nativity', c.1515 - 1520, oil on oak. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.
Jan de Beer, ‘The Nativity’, c.1515-1520, oil on oak. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.

In my last sessions at the Barber Institute of Fine Art, I completed a reference fact sheet on a work completed by Mannerist artist Jan de Beer between 1515 and 1520. The work is a double-sided panel painting, with one side depicting a nocturnal nativity scene and the other highlighting the moment when Joseph is chosen to be the Virgin’s husband. The panel recently returned from five years of conservation work so the Learning and Access team asked me to put together the document to facilitate future gallery talks on the work. It was fascinating to learn that the panel once likely formed part of a door on an altarpiece, which would have meant that an image was visible at all times, whether the doors were open or closed. The Nativity scene was almost certainly the interior side, as it depicts a ‘holier’ scene than that of Joseph and the suitors, therefore affording it a place closer to the altar.

Silver stater minted by the Persian satrap (governor) Mazaios. The obverse depicts Baaltars, the deity of the town of Tarsus, which is where the coin was minted. c.361-334 BCE.
Silver stater minted by the Persian satrap (governor) Mazaios. Obverse: Baaltars, the deity of the town of Tarsus, which is where the coin was minted. Reverse: a lion attacking a bull. c.361-334 BCE. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.
Silver tetradrachm minted by Antigonus III Doson, king of Macedon. Obverse: wreathed head of Poseidon, facing right. Reverse: Apollo seated on the prow of a ship, facing left. Inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ (of the king Antigonus). c.229-221 BCE.
Silver tetradrachm minted by Antigonus III Doson, king of Macedon. Obverse: wreathed head of Poseidon, facing right. Reverse: Apollo seated on the prow of a ship, facing left. Inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ (‘of the king Antigonus’). c.229-221 BCE. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.

I was also lucky enough to do some more work with the Barber’s Greek coins in my final week. While I was unable to finish documenting all of the coins, it was certainly a start and I hope my work will make Jonathan’s task ever so slightly lighter. In a day of digital transactions, it’s easy to become desensitized to the imagery on coinage. However, working with the Barber’s ancient coins really made me appreciate how these tiny metal tokens could tell stories and distribute information. Whether they associated the issuing ruler with a god or mythical hero, celebrated their victory or simply depicted symbols of power (as is particularly the case with the lion and stag above), these coins acted as a highly effective form of visual communication and propaganda in what would have been a mostly illiterate society. So, the next time you have some coins in your pocket, think about their history and just how important they were in ancient times!

It was an absolute pleasure working with Jen and Alex from the Learning and Access team and coin curator Jonathan at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts during my placement. Needless to say, I got a bit teary when they gave me a beautiful card and some delicious chocolates on my last day!

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Surveying items in the Heritage collection storeroom at Redmarley. Photograph by Anna Young.
Having a look at some of the diverse objects in the University of Birmingham's Heritage collection. Photograph by Anna Young.
Having a look at some of the diverse objects in the University of Birmingham’s Heritage collection. Photograph by Anna Young.

Another project I completed in my final week was my survey of Research and Cultural Collection’s Heritage store. By the end of the project, I had checked and documented the details of close to 450 objects, seeing whether any had been moved from their recorded locations and identifying those requiring accessioning. This task certainly made me appreciate the importance of conducting such surveys, as I was able to gain greater understanding of the collection as a whole and prioritise collection management needs. In the case of the Heritage store, accessioning its remaining items is certainly at the top of the list, as this will allow them to be used in teaching and to go on display. Although I identified a vast number of unaccessioned items, my survey will give RCC’s Clare Marlow a better idea of what needs to be documented and where to find it and, hopefully, make the task a little bit easier! This was a very rewarding project to undertake and I’m glad I could complete it within the timeframe.

Front cover of the 'Building Stones Detective Trail' pamphlet. Text by Julie (Lapworth volunteer), design by Amy Walsh.
Front cover of the ‘Building Stones Detective Trail’ pamphlet. Text by Julie (Lapworth volunteer), design by Amy Walsh.

For my last few sessions at the Lapworth Museum of Geology, I was lucky enough to work with another volunteer to help her visualise a pamphlet she created. Julie, a keen amateur geologist, put together a wonderful discovery trail to lead readers on a geological tour of some the different building stones used in Birmingham’s iconic monuments, which will coincide with the Lapworth’s joint exhibition with the Library of Birmingham. It was my task to turn her information and photos into an eye-catching document but I wanted to make sure Julie was comfortable with what I was doing. We sat down for a chat and she emphasised the importance of making the information very clear and easy to read. With this in mind, I chose a clear font, minimal colours and simple graphics, ensuring that her information and photos took pride of place. I certainly enjoyed learning about the geological history of these stones so I have no doubt others will too! It was a pleasure to collaborate with Julie and the task was an excellent exercise in visual design and teamwork.

Marie Curie's letter to Sir Oliver Lodge. This is the letter I helped prepare for the exhibition, which included tape removal, flattening and mounting. Photograph by Amy Walsh.
Marie Curie’s letter to Sir Oliver Lodge, on display in Oliver Lodge: Civic Science and Birmingham. This is the letter I helped prepare for the exhibition, which included tape removal, flattening and mounting. Photograph by Amy Walsh.

As I mentioned earlier, I didn’t have any scheduled activities on Friday so I used my time to catch up with those I missed while I was ill earlier on in the week. I shared a lovely afternoon tea with Marie Sviergula from the Wilson Conservation Studio and then headed to Muirhead Tower (home of the Cadbury Research Library and Wilson Studio) to view the fruits of our labour. Oliver Lodge: Civic Science and Birmingham looked very smart in the atrium’s red exhibition case. It was very special to be able to look at the works and pick out those I had helped prepare. You can view an expanded digital version of the exhibition here. I also dropped into Winterbourne House and Garden to thank my supervisors Lee Hale and Claire Woolard, hand over my WWI pamphlet and take a final look at the picturesque building and its grounds.

I tried a haggis scotch egg... Surprisingly delicious! Photograph by Amy Walsh.
We tried a haggis scotch egg… Surprisingly delicious! Photograph by Amy Walsh.

To celebrate the end of my placement, the lovely RCC team took me out for dinner on the Friday night. Clare Mullett, Anna Young, Clare Marlow, Nadia Awal and I shared a delicious meal at the Fighting Cocks pub in nearby Moseley and finished off the evening at the quirky Prince of Wales beer garden a little further up the road. These lovely ladies were so incredibly supportive throughout my placement and made the whole experience very special, so I got a bit teary when it was time to go! They kindly gave me some gifts to remember my time with them: a University of Birmingham jumper and a copy of The Mermaid and the Lion, a beautiful graphic novel by RCC’s previous artist in residence Sarah Silverwood.

While I was very sad to leave, I know I have made some wonderful friends and professional connections during my time in Birmingham and I am very much looking forward to visiting again soon!